Evidence for mutualist limitation: the impacts of conspecific density on the mycorrhizal inoculum potential of woodland soils

@article{Haskins2005EvidenceFM,
  title={Evidence for mutualist limitation: the impacts of conspecific density on the mycorrhizal inoculum potential of woodland soils},
  author={Kristin E. Haskins and Catherine A. Gehring},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2005},
  volume={145},
  pages={123-131}
}
The ability of seedlings to establish can depend on the availability of appropriate mycorrhizal fungal inoculum. The possibility that mycorrhizal mutualists limit the distribution of seedlings may depend on the prevalence of the plant hosts that form the same type of mycorrhizal association as the target seedling species and thus provide inoculum. We tested this hypothesis by measuring ectomycorrhizal (EM) fine root distribution and conducting an EM inoculum potential bioassay along a gradient… 

Below-ground interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal shrubs decrease the performance of pinyon pine and the abundance of its ectomycorrhizas.

The results suggest that below-ground competition with AM shrubs negatively impacted both pinyons and EM fungi, and similar competitive effects may be observed in other ecosystems given that drought frequency and severity are predicted to increase for many land interiors.

Limited overall impacts of ectomycorrhizal inoculation on recruitment of boreal trees into Arctic tundra following wildfire belie species-specific responses

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Root-associated fungal community response to drought-associated changes in vegetation community

There was a significant difference between RAF communities from woodland vs. savanna, indicating that abiotic factors such as temperature and aridity might be more important in structuring these RAF communities than biotic factors suchAs plant host or neighbor identity.

Neighboring trees affect ectomycorrhizal fungal community composition in a woodland-forest ecotone

The findings suggest that neighboring tree species identity shaped EMF community structure, but that these effects were specific to host-neighbor combinations.

Root-Associated Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Shared by Various Boreal Forest Seedlings Naturally Regenerating after a Fire in Interior Alaska and Correlation of Different Fungi with Host Growth Responses

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Mycorrhizal type of woody plants influences understory species richness in British broadleaved woodlands

Summary Mature temperate woodlands are commonly dominated by ectomycorrhizal trees, whereas understory plants predominantly form arbuscular mycorrhizal associations. Due to differences in

Inoculum potential of Pinus edulis-associated ectomycorrhizal fungi across a forest extirpation chronosequence

Populations of Pinus edulis are declining with ongoing climate change. Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of P. edulis-associated ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) for seedling establishment

Legacy effects of tree mortality mediated by ectomycorrhizal fungal communities.

Findings suggest that while mature pinyon mortality led to competitive release for established juvenile pinyons, changes in EMF community composition with mortality could limit successful seedling establishment and growth in high mortality sites.

Plant genetics and interspecific competitive interactions determine ectomycorrhizal fungal community responses to climate change

These complex, genetic‐based interactions among species (tree‐shrub‐herbivore‐fungus) argue that the ultimate impacts of climate change are both ecological and evolutionary.

The effect of forest soil and community composition on ectomycorrhizal colonization and seedling growth

The results support previously observed positive feedbacks between conspecifics under hemlock forest communities and provides evidence for the role of the EMF community within this feedback loop.

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