• Corpus ID: 17282979

Evidence for inequalities in morbidity and mortality by occupational social class and material standard of living has become irrefutable

@inproceedings{McKenzieEvidenceFI,
  title={Evidence for inequalities in morbidity and mortality by occupational social class and material standard of living has become irrefutable},
  author={Kwame McKenzie and Rob Whitley and Scott Weich}
}
Evidence for inequalities in morbidity and mortality by occupational social and mortality by occupational social class and material standard of living class and material standard of living has become irrefutable (Acheson, has become irrefutable (Acheson, 1998). Attention has now turned to 1998). Attention has now turned to the effects of social context (MacIntyre the effects of social context (MacIntyre et al Despite the political imperative 2001). Despite the political imperative to build… 

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