Evidence for genetic variation in worker task performance by African and European honey bees

@article{Fewell2002EvidenceFG,
  title={Evidence for genetic variation in worker task performance by African and European honey bees},
  author={Jennifer H. Fewell and Susan M. Bertram},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={52},
  pages={318-325}
}
Abstract. The dramatic competitive advantage of the African honey bee over European bees in the neotropics comes in large part from their faster rates of colony growth and reproduction. In honey bees, brood production, and thus colony growth, are controlled by the workers. Thus, we tested for genetic differences between African and European workers in their preference for tasks associated with brood production by monitoring individual African and European workers cross-fostered in common colony… Expand

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