Evidence for genetic monogamy and female‐biased dispersal in the biparental mouthbrooding cichlid Eretmodus cyanostictus from Lake Tanganyika

@article{Taylor2003EvidenceFG,
  title={Evidence for genetic monogamy and female‐biased dispersal in the biparental mouthbrooding cichlid Eretmodus cyanostictus from Lake Tanganyika},
  author={Martin I. Taylor and Josephine Isabelle Morley and Ciro Rico and Sigal Balshine},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2003},
  volume={12}
}
In this study, we investigate whether apparent social monogamy (where a species forms a pair bond but may participate in copulations outside the pair bond) corresponds with genetic monogamy (where individuals participate only in copulations within a pair bond) in a biparental mouthbrooding cichlid fish, Eretmodus cyanostictus, from Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Our findings suggest that E. cyanostictus is both socially and genetically monogamous and that monogamy may result from limited… Expand

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