Evidence for double resistance to permethrin and malathion in head lice

@article{Downs1999EvidenceFD,
  title={Evidence for double resistance to permethrin and malathion in head lice},
  author={Downs and Stafford and Harvey and Coles},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={1999},
  volume={141}
}
  • Downs, Stafford, +1 author Coles
  • Published 1999
  • Biology, Medicine
  • British Journal of Dermatology
A rising prevalence of head lice among school children and rising sales of insecticides with anecdotal evidence of their treatment failure, led us to examine whether head lice in Bristol and Bath were resistant to the insecticides available for treating head lice. Ten schools in Bristol and Bath were visited to collect field samples of head lice. A comparison was made of the survival rates of fully sensitive laboratory reared body lice and field samples of head lice on insecticide exposure. To… Expand
Survey of permethrin and malathion resistance in human head lice populations from Denmark.
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The connection between permethrin resistance and kdr-like mutations is confirmed by the authors' findings and the frequency of the double mutation T929I-L932 F in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene associated with permETHrin resistance was 0.95 in Danish head lice populations. Expand
Survey of Permethrin and Malathion Resistance in Human Head Lice Populations from Denmark
TLDR
The connection between permethrin resistance and kdr-like mutations is confirmed by the findings and the frequency of the double mutation T929I-L932 F in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene associated with permethin resistance was 0.95 in Danish head lice populations. Expand
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Managing Head Lice in an Era of Increasing Resistance to Insecticides
  • A. Downs
  • Medicine
  • American journal of clinical dermatology
  • 2004
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South Florida lice exhibited a significantly slower mortality response to permethrin compared with susceptible Ecuadorian lice, and the presence of the T929I and L932F mutations was confirmed by DNA sequencing in lice collected from children in south Florida that were resistant to the pediculicidal effects ofpermethrin and the leading permETHrin-based head lice product, Nix. Expand
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  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2001
The treatment of head lice is now complicated by the emergence of resistance to pediculicides. Most clinical trials were done before resistance emerged and reviews of these trials do not give clearExpand
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