Evidence for biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria pastures

@article{Subbarao2009EvidenceFB,
  title={Evidence for biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria pastures},
  author={G. Subbarao and K. Nakahara and M. Hurtado and H. Ono and D. Moreta and A. Salcedo and A. T. Yoshihashi and T. Ishikawa and M. Ishitani and M. Ohnishi-Kameyama and M. Yoshida and M. Rond{\'o}n and I. Rao and C. Lascano and W. Berry and O. Ito},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={106},
  pages={17302 - 17307}
}
Nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that generates nitrate through microbial activity, may enhance losses of fertilizer nitrogen by leaching and denitrification. Certain plants can suppress soil-nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). Here, we report the discovery of an effective nitrification inhibitor in the root-exudates of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick. Named… Expand
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TLDR
This review outlines the current status of knowledge regarding the potential for genetic improvement in the BNI capacity of the Triticeae and suggests approaches are critical to the development of the next-generation of crops and production systems where nitrification is biologically suppressed/regulated to reduce nitrogen leakage and protect the environment from nitrogen pollution. Expand
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The Contribution of Root Turnover on Biological Nitrification Inhibition and Its Impact on the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea under Brachiaria Cultivations
TLDR
The release of BNI substances through plant decomposition contributes to the decrease in the abundance of AOA, and thus the inhibition of nitrification under Brachiaria cultivation, according to multiple regression analysis. Expand
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References

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Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI)—is it a widespread phenomenon?
TLDR
It is suggested that the BNI capacity could either be managed and/or introduced into pastures/crops with an expression of this phenomenon, via genetic improvement approaches that combine high productivity along with some capacity to regulate soil nitrification process. Expand
Plant-based manipulation of nitrification in soil: a new approach to managing N loss?
TLDR
Evidence is produced that a tropical grass species, Brachiaria humidicola, produces chemicals that inhibit nitrification in soil, described as biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs), which highlights how molecular biology can be used to introduce traits into micro-organisms responsible for key soil N transformations in a way that facilitates analysis of the interaction between plants and the soil environment so crucial to their growth and survival. Expand
NH4+ triggers the synthesis and release of biological nitrification inhibition compounds in Brachiaria humidicola roots
TLDR
Results indicate that the release of BNI-compounds from B. humidicola roots is a regulated function and that presence of NH4+ in the root environment is necessary for the sustained synthesis and release ofBNI. Expand
Grass populations control nitrification in savanna soils
TLDR
Results suggest that plant species can have important consequences for N cycling at the population level, as the denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) is much higher in the high-nitrification site than in the low-nitrifying site. Expand
A bioluminescence assay to detect nitrification inhibitors released from plant roots: a case study with Brachiaria humidicola
TLDR
The proposed bioluminescence assay can be used to characterize and determine the BNI activity of plant roots, thus it could become a powerful tool in genetically exploiting the B NI trait in crops and pastures. Expand
Modelling approach to analyse the effects of nitrification inhibition on primary production
Summary 1. Wet tropical savannas have high grass productivity despite the fact that nitrogen is generally limiting for primary production and soil nutrient content is typically very low. NitrogenExpand
Scope and Strategies for Regulation of Nitrification in Agricultural Systems—Challenges and Opportunities
Nitrification, a microbial process, is a key component and integral part of the nitrogen (N) cycle. Soil N is in a constant state of flux, moving and changing chemical forms. During nitrification, aExpand
Detection, isolation and characterization of a root-exuded compound, methyl 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionate, responsible for biological nitrification inhibition by sorghum (Sorghum bicolor).
TLDR
Methyl 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionate is the first compound purified from the root exudates of any species; this is an important step towards better understanding BNI in sorghum. Expand
Free fatty acids from the pasture grass Brachiaria humidicola and one of their methyl esters as inhibitors of nitrification
The tropical pasture grass, Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick, produces nitrification inhibitory compounds (termed biological nitrification inhibitors or BNIs) in its shoot and root tissues andExpand
Can biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) genes from perennial Leymus racemosus (Triticeae) combat nitrification in wheat farming?
TLDR
The first finding of high production of BNI in a wild relative of any cereal is reported and its successful introduction and expression in cultivated wheat demonstrates the potential for empowering the new generation of wheat cultivars with high-BNI capacity to control nitrification in wheat-production systems. Expand
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