Evidence for a limit to human lifespan

@article{Dong2016EvidenceFA,
  title={Evidence for a limit to human lifespan},
  author={Xiao Dong and Brandon Milholland and Jan Vijg},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={538},
  pages={257-259}
}
Driven by technological progress, human life expectancy has increased greatly since the nineteenth century. Demographic evidence has revealed an ongoing reduction in old-age mortality and a rise of the maximum age at death, which may gradually extend human longevity. Together with observations that lifespan in various animal species is flexible and can be increased by genetic or pharmaceutical intervention, these results have led to suggestions that longevity may not be subject to strict… 
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