Evidence for a Remarkably Large Toothed-Monotreme from the Early Cretaceous of Lightning Ridge, NSW, Australia

@inproceedings{Rich2020EvidenceFA,
  title={Evidence for a Remarkably Large Toothed-Monotreme from the Early Cretaceous of Lightning Ridge, NSW, Australia},
  author={Thomas H. Rich and Tim Fridtjof Flannery and Pat Vickers-Rich},
  year={2020}
}
2 Citations

A review of monotreme (Monotremata) evolution

Abstract Advances in dating and systematics have prompted a revision of monotreme evolution to refine the timing of adaptative trends affecting body size and craniodental morphology. The oldest known

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    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London
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For the purpose of continuing some recent work upon various epidermic structures in Ornithorhynchus, Dr. Parker very kindly placed his most valuable material at my disposal. Among other things was a