Evidence for a Mid-Jurassic Adaptive Radiation in Mammals

@article{Close2015EvidenceFA,
  title={Evidence for a Mid-Jurassic Adaptive Radiation in Mammals},
  author={Roger A. Close and Matt Friedman and Graeme T. Lloyd and Roger B. J. Benson},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={25},
  pages={2137-2142}
}
A series of spectacular discoveries have transformed our understanding of Mesozoic mammals in recent years. These finds reveal hitherto-unsuspected ecomorphological diversity that suggests that mammals experienced a major adaptive radiation during the Middle to Late Jurassic. Patterns of mammalian macroevolution must be reinterpreted in light of these new discoveries, but only taxonomic diversity and limited aspects of morphological disparity have been quantified. We assess rates of… 

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