Evidence for DNA loss as a determinant of genome size.

@article{Petrov2000EvidenceFD,
  title={Evidence for DNA loss as a determinant of genome size.},
  author={Dmitri A. Petrov and Todd A. Sangster and J. Spencer Johnston and Daniel L. Hartl and Kharissa L Shaw},
  journal={Science},
  year={2000},
  volume={287 5455},
  pages={
          1060-2
        }
}
Eukaryotic genome sizes range over five orders of magnitude. This variation cannot be explained by differences in organismic complexity (the C value paradox). To test the hypothesis that some variation in genome size can be attributed to differences in the patterns of insertion and deletion (indel) mutations among organisms, this study examines the indel spectrum in Laupala crickets, which have a genome size 11 times larger than that of Drosophila. Consistent with the hypothesis, DNA loss is… 
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