Evidence for Calcium Carbonate at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site

@article{Boynton2009EvidenceFC,
  title={Evidence for Calcium Carbonate at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site},
  author={William V. Boynton and Doug W. Ming and Samuel P. Kounaves and Suzanne M. M. Young and Raymond E. Arvidson and Michael H. Hecht and John H. Hoffman and Paul B. Niles and David K. Hamara and Richard C. Quinn and P. H. Smith and Brad Sutter and David C. Catling and Richard V. Morris},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={325},
  pages={61 - 64}
}
Phoenix Ascending The Phoenix mission landed on Mars in March 2008 with the goal of studying the ice-rich soil of the planet's northern arctic region. Phoenix included a robotic arm, with a camera attached to it, with the capacity to excavate through the soil to the ice layer beneath it, scoop up soil and water ice samples, and deliver them to a combination of other instruments—including a wet chemistry lab and a high-temperature oven combined with a mass spectrometer—for chemical and… 

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[1] A primary objective of the Phoenix mission was to examine the characteristics of high latitude ground ice on Mars. We report observations of ground ice, its depth distribution and stability

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Detection of Perchlorate and the Soluble Chemistry of Martian Soil at the Phoenix Lander Site

Results suggest that the soil at the Phoenix landing site must have suffered alteration through the action of liquid water in geologically the recent past, and revealed an alkaline environment in contrast to that found by the Mars Exploration Rovers, indicating that many different environments have existed on Mars.

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