Event-related brain responses to morphological violations in Catalan.

@article{RodrguezFornells2001EventrelatedBR,
  title={Event-related brain responses to morphological violations in Catalan.},
  author={Antoni Rodr{\'i}guez-Fornells and Harald Clahsen and Concepcion Lleo and Wanda Zaake and T. M{\"u}nte},
  journal={Brain research. Cognitive brain research},
  year={2001},
  volume={11 1},
  pages={
          47-58
        }
}
The ERP (event-related potential) violation paradigm was used to investigate brain responses to morphologically correct and incorrect verb forms of Catalan. Violations of stem formation and inflectional processes were examined in separate experimental conditions. Our most interesting finding is that misapplications of stem formation rules elicit an early left preponderant negativity. This complements our previous ERP results on morphological violations in other languages in which… Expand

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