Event-related brain potentials in the study of visual selective attention.

@article{Hillyard1998EventrelatedBP,
  title={Event-related brain potentials in the study of visual selective attention.},
  author={Steven A. Hillyard and Lourdes Anllo-Vento},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1998},
  volume={95 3},
  pages={
          781-7
        }
}
  • S. Hillyard, L. Anllo-Vento
  • Published 3 February 1998
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) provide high-resolution measures of the time course of neuronal activity patterns associated with perceptual and cognitive processes. New techniques for ERP source analysis and comparisons with data from blood-flow neuroimaging studies enable improved localization of cortical activity during visual selective attention. ERP modulations during spatial attention point toward a mechanism of gain control over information flow in extrastriate visual cortical… 

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