Event-related brain potentials distinguish processing stages involved in face perception and recognition

@article{Eimer2000EventrelatedBP,
  title={Event-related brain potentials distinguish processing stages involved in face perception and recognition},
  author={Martin Eimer},
  journal={Clinical Neurophysiology},
  year={2000},
  volume={111},
  pages={694-705}
}
OBJECTIVES An event-related brain potential (ERP) study investigated how different processing stages involved in face identification are reflected by ERP modulations, and how stimulus repetitions and attentional set influence such effects. METHODS ERPs were recorded in response to photographs of familiar faces, unfamiliar faces, and houses. In Part I, participants had to detect infrequently presented targets (hands), in Part II, attention was either directed towards or away from the pictorial… CONTINUE READING

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