Evaluation of twice-daily lower-dose trilostane treatment administered orally in dogs with naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism.

@article{Feldman2011EvaluationOT,
  title={Evaluation of twice-daily lower-dose trilostane treatment administered orally in dogs with naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism.},
  author={Edward C. Feldman},
  journal={Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
  year={2011},
  volume={238 11},
  pages={
          1441-51
        }
}
  • E. Feldman
  • Published 2011
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
OBJECTIVE To evaluate effectiveness and incidence of adverse reactions to twice-daily lower-dose oral administration of trilostane in the treatment of dogs with naturally occurring hyperadrenocorticism (NOH). DESIGN Clinical trial. ANIMALS 47 dogs with NOH. PROCEDURES 47 dogs were treated orally with trilostane (0.21 to 1.1 mg/kg [0.1 to 0.5 mg/lb], q 12 h). All dogs were reevaluated at 2 weeks and 2 months, 38 dogs at 6 months, and 28 dogs at 1 year of treatment. RESULTS 9 of 47 dogs… 

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