Evaluation of the bank stability and toe erosion model (BSTEM) for predicting lateral retreat on composite streambanks

@article{Midgley2012EvaluationOT,
  title={Evaluation of the bank stability and toe erosion model (BSTEM) for predicting lateral retreat on composite streambanks},
  author={Taber L. Midgley and Garey A. Fox and Derek M. Heeren},
  journal={Geomorphology},
  year={2012},
  volume={145},
  pages={107-114}
}
Evaluating a process‐based model for use in streambank stabilization: insights on the Bank Stability and Toe Erosion Model (BSTEM)
Streambank retreat is a complex cyclical process involving subaerial processes, fluvial erosion, seepage erosion, and geotechnical failures and is driven by several soil properties that themselves
Streambank sediment loading rates at the watershed scale and the benefit of riparian protection
Streambank erosion is a pathway for sediment and nutrient loading to streams, but insufficient data exist on the magnitude of this source. Riparian protection can significantly decrease streambank
USING RAPID GEOMORPHIC ASSESSMENTS TO ASSESS STREAMBANK STABILITY IN OKLAHOMA OZARK STREAMS
High streambank erosion and failure rates on streams in the Ozark ecoregion of Oklahoma may be attributed to land use change and degradation of riparian areas. Numerous benefits may be achieved from
MODELING STREAMBANK EROSION ON COMPOSITE STREAMBANKS ON A WATERSHED SCALE
Streambanks can be a significant source of sediment and phosphorus to aquatic ecosystems. Although the streambank-erosion routine in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has improved in recent
Testing of the Modified Streambank Erosion and Instream Phosphorus Routines for the SWAT Model
In some watersheds, streambanks are a source of two major pollutants, phosphorus (P) and sediment. P originating from both uplands and streambanks can be transported and stored indefinitely on
Modelling of the retreat process of composite riverbank in the Jingjiang Reach using the improved BSTEM
Bank retreat in the Jingjiang Reach is closely related not only to the near‐bank intensity of fluvial erosion but also to the composition and mechanical properties of bank soils. Therefore, it is
Watershed and streambank erosion modeling in a coldwater stream using the GWLF-E model: application and evaluation
While many watershed models estimate overland flow-related soil loss, streambank erosion is often overlooked even though it can be the dominant source of sediment in a catchment. We used the enhanced
Watershed Variability in Streambank Erodibility and Implications for Erosion Prediction
Two fluvial erosion models are commonly used to simulate the erosion rate of cohesive soils: the empirical excess shear stress model and the mechanistic Wilson model. Both models include two soil
Quantifying Sediment Loads from Streambank Erosion and Potential Load Reductions from Streambank Stabilization Using Process-based Modeling
Unstable streambanks contribute a significant sediment load to surface waters in some watersheds. Streambank stabilization techniques are available to increase stability of streambanks or reduce
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