Evaluation of lactic acid as an initial and secondary subprimal intervention for Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and a nonpathogenic E. coli surrogate for E. coli O157:H7.

@article{Pittman2012EvaluationOL,
  title={Evaluation of lactic acid as an initial and secondary subprimal intervention for Escherichia coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and a nonpathogenic E. coli surrogate for E. coli O157:H7.},
  author={C. Pittman and I. Geornaras and D. Woerner and K. Nightingale and J. Sofos and L. Goodridge and K. Belk},
  journal={Journal of food protection},
  year={2012},
  volume={75 9},
  pages={
          1701-8
        }
}
  • C. Pittman, I. Geornaras, +4 authors K. Belk
  • Published 2012
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Journal of food protection
  • Lactic acid can reduce microbial contamination on beef carcass surfaces when used as a food safety intervention, but effectiveness when applied to the surface of chilled beef subprimal sections is not well documented. Studies characterizing bacterial reduction on subprimals after lactic acid treatment would be useful for validations of hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) systems. The objective of this study was to validate initial use of lactic acid as a subprimal intervention during… CONTINUE READING
    Peri- and Postharvest Factors in the Control of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Beef.
    • 16
    • Open Access

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