Evaluation of a Lay First Fesponder Program in Sierra Leone as a Scalable Model for Prehospital Trauma Care.

@article{Eisner2020EvaluationOA,
  title={Evaluation of a Lay First Fesponder Program in Sierra Leone as a Scalable Model for Prehospital Trauma Care.},
  author={Zachary J Eisner and Peter G. Delaney and Alfred H. Thullah and Amanda J. Yu and Sallieu B Timbo and Sylvester Koroma and Kpawuru Sandy and Abdulai Daniel Sesay and Patrick E Turay and John W. Scott and Krishnan Raghavendran},
  journal={Injury},
  year={2020},
  pages={
          8996
        }
}
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