Evaluation of Indicator Bacteria Export from an Urban Watershed

@inproceedings{Hathaway2010EvaluationOI,
  title={Evaluation of Indicator Bacteria Export from an Urban Watershed},
  author={Jon Michael Hathaway and William F. Hunt},
  year={2010}
}
Studies have shown stormwater runoff is a contributor to elevated indicator bacteria concentrations in surface waters. These elevated concentrations may indicate a heightened human health risk and lead to water quality violations as concentrations exceed regulatory standards. Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) are commonly established for indicator bacteria, requiring modeling and watershed planning to reduce loadings. However, factors correlated to indicator bacteria build-up and transport in… 

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