Evaluation of 100 patients with dementia in São Paulo, Brazil: correlation with socioeconomic status and education.

Abstract

One hundred consecutive outpatients with dementia were prospectively studied to investigate the diagnoses of dementing diseases and to correlate these diagnoses with socioeconomic status and with education. Alzheimer disease was the most common cause of dementia (54%), followed by vascular dementia (20%). Eight patients presented with potentially reversible causes of dementia. These frequencies are similar to those reported by case register studies from Western Europe and the United States. We did not find differences in the frequencies of the dementing diseases according to socioeconomic status or education. Alzheimer disease was the most common cause of dementia in all socioeconomic classes. Potentially reversible dementias, vascular dementias, and other secondary dementias were not more frequent in the lower socioeconomic strata. There was a trend to a higher frequency of vascular dementia among patients with less education, but this was not statistically significant.

Cite this paper

@article{Nitrini1995EvaluationO1, title={Evaluation of 100 patients with dementia in S{\~a}o Paulo, Brazil: correlation with socioeconomic status and education.}, author={Ricardo Nitrini and Stefan Mathias and Paulo Caramelli and Paulo Eduardo Mestrinelli Carrilho and Beatriz Helena Lef{\`e}vre and Cl{\'a}udia Sellitto Porto and M C Magila and Carlos A. Buchpiguel and Nestor de Barros and Sandra F Mm Gualandro}, journal={Alzheimer disease and associated disorders}, year={1995}, volume={9 3}, pages={146-51} }