Evaluating the effectiveness of aquatic therapy on mobility, balance, and level of functional independence in stroke rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Iliescu2019EvaluatingTE,
  title={Evaluating the effectiveness of aquatic therapy on mobility, balance, and level of functional independence in stroke rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Alice Mary Iliescu and Amanda McIntyre and Joshua C Wiener and Jerome Iruthayarajah and and Jung-Han Lee and Sarah Caughlin and Robert Teasell},
  journal={Clinical Rehabilitation},
  year={2019},
  volume={34},
  pages={56 - 68}
}
Objective: To meta-analyze and systematically review the effectiveness of aquatic therapy in improving mobility, balance, and functional independence after stroke. Data Sources: Articles published in Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Scopus up to 20 August 2019. Study Selection: Studies met the following inclusion criteria: (1) English, (2) adult stroke population, (3) randomized or non-randomized prospectively controlled trial (RCT or PCT, respectively) study design, (4) the experimental… 

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HT is superior to land therapy program regarding postural balance in terms of BBS, ML and AP sway velocity of center of pressure.
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“fair” evidence was showed supporting the use of aquatic therapy to improve dynamic balance and gait speed in adults with certain neurological conditions, as summarized in this synthesis.
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Postural balance and knee flexor strength were improved after aquatic therapy based on the Halliwick and Ai Chi methods in stroke survivors, with significant improvements in Berg Balance Scale scores and weight-bearing ability.
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TLDR
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