Evaluating Global Biodiversity Hotspots – Very Rich and Even More Endangered

@article{Hrdina2017EvaluatingGB,
  title={Evaluating Global Biodiversity Hotspots – Very Rich and Even More Endangered},
  author={Ale{\vs} Hrdina and Du{\vs}an Romportl},
  journal={Journal of Landscape Ecology},
  year={2017},
  volume={10},
  pages={108 - 115}
}
Abstract Species on the Earth are under increasing human pressure, according to some authors, the current rate of extinction occurred only a few times in the past, for the last time in the Cretaceous Period in the Mesozoic Era. The main goal of current nature conservation is to maintain the highest native biological diversity and to preserve and enhance life-supporting ecosystem processes, functions and services with the best possible use of financial resources. The areas where can be found the… Expand
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