Eusociality has evolved independently in two genera of bathyergid mole-rats — but occurs in no other subterranean mammal

@article{Jarvis2005EusocialityHE,
  title={Eusociality has evolved independently in two genera of bathyergid mole-rats — but occurs in no other subterranean mammal},
  author={Jennifer U. M. Jarvis and Nigel Charles Bennett},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={33},
  pages={253-260}
}
SummaryExtensive field and laboratory studies show that Damaraland mole-rats, like naked mole-rats, have an extreme form of vertebrate sociality. Colonies usually contain 2 reproductives and up to 39 non-breeding siblings, 90% of whom live a socially-induced lifetime of sterility; they remain in the natal colony, forage for food, defend the colony and care for successive litters. Although there is heightened dispersal following good rainfall, the majority of adult non-reproductives remain in… 

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