European/Canadian multicenter, double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled study of the effects of glatiramer acetate on magnetic resonance imaging–measured disease activity and burden in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis

@article{Comi2001EuropeanCanadianMD,
  title={European/Canadian multicenter, double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled study of the effects of glatiramer acetate on magnetic resonance imaging–measured disease activity and burden in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis},
  author={Giancarlo Comi and Massimo Filippi and Jerry S. Wolinsky},
  journal={Annals of Neurology},
  year={2001},
  volume={49}
}
Two prior double‐blind, placebo‐controlled, randomized trials demonstrated that glatiramer acetate (GA) reduces relapse rates in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This study was designed to determine the effect, onset, and durability of any effect of GA on disease activity monitored with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with RRMS. Two hundred thirty‐nine eligible patients were randomized to receive either 20 mg GA (n = 119) or placebo (n = 120) by daily… Expand
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