Etomidate versus ketamine for rapid sequence intubation in acutely ill patients: a multicentre randomised controlled trial

@article{Jabre2009EtomidateVK,
  title={Etomidate versus ketamine for rapid sequence intubation in acutely ill patients: a multicentre randomised controlled trial},
  author={Patricia Jabre and Xavier Combes and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Lapostolle and Mohamed Dhaouadi and Agn{\`e}s Ricard-Hibon and Beno{\^i}t Vivien and Lionel Bertrand and Alexandra Beltramini and Pascale Gamand and St{\'e}phane Albizzati and Deborah Perdrizet and Gaelle Lebail and Charlotte Chollet-X{\'e}mard and Virginie Maxime and Christian Brun-Buisson and Jean Yves Lefrant and Pierre Edouard Bollaert and Bruno M{\'e}garbane and Jean-Damien Ricard and Nadia Anguel and Eric Vicaut and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Adnet},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2009},
  volume={374},
  pages={293-300}
}

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