Etomidate for emergency anaesthesia; mad, bad and dangerous to know?

@article{Morris2005EtomidateFE,
  title={Etomidate for emergency anaesthesia; mad, bad and dangerous to know?},
  author={C. Morris and Catherine McAllister},
  journal={Anaesthesia},
  year={2005},
  volume={60}
}
In the United Kingdom over the period 2001 ⁄ 02, a total of 20 130 deaths within 30 days of surgery were reported to NCEPOD (National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcomes and Deaths) [1]. Of these deaths, 15.8% followed non-elective surgery (i.e. urgent or emergency), although this proportion was nearer 25% for certain specialties such as trauma, orthopaedics, vascular and neurosurgery. Similarly, in the placebo limb of a recent study of high risk patients undergoing major elective… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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