Ethnic variation in cancer patients’ ratings of information provision, communication and overall care

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Ethnic inequalities in cancer patient experience exist but variation within broad ethnic categories is under-explored. This study aimed to describe variation by ethnic sub-category in experiences of information provision and communication (key domains of patient experience) using National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) data. DESIGN The NCPES 2012-2013 contained responses from 68,737 cancer patients treated at 155 NHS Trusts in England. Multivariate logistic regression was used to investigate associations between ethnicity and patients' ratings of overall care, information provision and communication. RESULTS Variation by and within broad ethnic categories was evident. Non-White patients (particularly Asian patients (ORadj:0.78; 95%CI:0.67-0.90, p=0.001)) were less likely than White patients to receive an understandable explanation of treatment side effects. Among Asian patients, those of Bangladeshi ethnicity were least likely to receive an understandable explanation. CONCLUSIONS Effective communication and information provision are important to ensure patients are well informed, receive the best possible care and have a positive patient experience. However, ethnic inequalities exist in cancer patients' experiences of information provision and communication with variation evident both between and within broad ethnic categories. Further work to understand the causes of this variation is required to address ethnic inequalities at practice and policy level.

DOI: 10.1080/13557858.2015.1126561

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Trenchard2016EthnicVI, title={Ethnic variation in cancer patients’ ratings of information provision, communication and overall care}, author={Lorna Trenchard and Louise Mc Grath-Lone and Helen Ward}, booktitle={Ethnicity & health}, year={2016} }