Ethnic comparisons of the cross‐sectional relationships between measures of body size with diabetes and hypertension

@article{Huxley2008EthnicCO,
  title={Ethnic comparisons of the cross‐sectional relationships between measures of body size with diabetes and hypertension},
  author={Rachel R. Huxley and W. Philip T. James and Farnaz Barzi and Jeetesh V. Patel and Scott A. Lear and Paibul Suriyawongpaisal and Edward Janus and Ian D. Caterson and Paul Z. Zimmet and Dorairaj Prabhakaran and Srinath Reddy and Mark Woodward},
  journal={Obesity Reviews},
  year={2008},
  volume={9}
}
Recent estimates indicate that two billion people are overweight or obese and hence are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and its comorbidities. [] Key Result Data from the Obesity in Asia Collaboration, comprising 21 cross-sectional studies in the Asia-Pacific region with information on more than 263,000 individuals, indicate that measures of central obesity, in particular, waist circumference (WC), are better discriminators of prevalent diabetes and hypertension in Asians and Caucasians, and are…
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