Ethical considerations in first-trimester Down syndrome risk assessment

@article{Chervenak2010EthicalCI,
  title={Ethical considerations in first-trimester Down syndrome risk assessment},
  author={Frank Chervenak and Laurence B. Mccullough},
  journal={Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology},
  year={2010},
  volume={22},
  pages={135–138}
}
Purpose of review First-trimester risk assessment has now become sophisticated and of increasing relevance and applicability to decision-making by pregnant woman about invasive diagnosis. Ethics is an essential dimension of understanding this relevance and applicability. This paper addresses the ethical dimensions of first-trimester risk assessment for trisomy 21. Recent findings It is now well established in the ethics and law of the informed consent process that physicians are obligated to… 
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