Estrogen therapy and liver function—metabolic effects of oral and parenteral administration

@article{VONSchoultz1989EstrogenTA,
  title={Estrogen therapy and liver function—metabolic effects of oral and parenteral administration},
  author={B O VON Schoultz and Kjell Carlstr{\"o}m and Lars G. Collste and Ambj{\"o}rn Eriksson and Peter Henriksson and {\AA}ke Pousette and Reinhard Stege},
  journal={The Prostate},
  year={1989},
  volume={14}
}
Oral estrogen therapy for prostatic cancer is clinically effective but also accompanied by severe cardiovascular side effects. Hypertension, venous thromboembolism, and other cardiovascular disorders are associated with alterations in liver metabolism. The impact of exogenous estrogens on the liver is dependent on the route of administration and the type and dose of estrogen. Oral administration of synthetic estrogens has profound effects on liver‐derived plasma proteins, coagulation factors… 
androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer - the potential of parenteral estrogen
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
During parenteral administration of estrogens or androgens, diverging effects on Lp(a) and serum lipoproteins were observed, suggesting that the regulatory role of sex hormones on serum Lp (a) levels may depend on their capability to influence hepatic metabolic pathways of L p(a).
Side effects of endocrine treatment and their mechanisms: Castration, antiandrogens, and estrogens
TLDR
This paper is a survey of the most important early side effects of the different modes of endocrine treatment, their etiology, and possible ways to avoid or treat them.
Androgen Deprivation Therapy and the Re-emergence of Parenteral Estrogen in Prostate Cancer.
Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) resulting in testosterone suppression is central to the management of prostate cancer (PC). As PC incidence increases, ADT is more frequently prescribed, and for
Effect of parenteral oestrogen on the coagulation system in patients with prostatic carcinoma.
TLDR
Parenteral administration of oestrogen caused a less marked change in the coagulation system than oral administration and should be the treatment of choice for prostatic carcinoma.
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