Estrogen and progestogen effect on venous thromboembolism in menopausal women

@article{Archer2012EstrogenAP,
  title={Estrogen and progestogen effect on venous thromboembolism in menopausal women},
  author={David F Archer and Emmanuel Oger},
  journal={Climacteric},
  year={2012},
  volume={15},
  pages={235 - 240}
}
ABSTRACT Prior to 1996, the use of postmenopausal estrogen was not believed to increase the risk of venous thrombosis. Subsequent studies, particularly the prospective, randomized, double-blind, clinical trial of the Women's Health Initiative, have clearly shown an increase in the incidence and risk of venous thrombosis in postmenopausal women using conjugated equine estrogens with or without medroxyprogesterone acetate. The risk of venous thrombosis in postmenopausal women is also increased by… Expand
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