Estimation of the true evolutionary distance under the fragile breakage model

@article{Alexeev2015EstimationOT,
  title={Estimation of the true evolutionary distance under the fragile breakage model},
  author={Nikita Alexeev and Max A. Alekseyev},
  journal={BMC Genomics},
  year={2015},
  volume={18}
}
BackgroundThe ability to estimate the evolutionary distance between extant genomes plays a crucial role in many phylogenomic studies. Often such estimation is based on the parsimony assumption, implying that the distance between two genomes can be estimated as the rearrangement distance equal the minimal number of genome rearrangements required to transform one genome into the other. However, in reality the parsimony assumption may not always hold, emphasizing the need for estimation that does… 
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