Estimation of the Prevalence of Pathogenic Mycobacteria in Organic Broiler Farms in Greece by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

Abstract

Avian mycobacteriosis is usually caused by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) serovars 1 to 3 (M. avium subsp. avium) and M. genavense (8, 9). In most cases, incidences are sporadic and they rarely refer to intensive farms since modern breeding practices have decreased exposure of birds to the parameters that were traditionally linked to the spread of mycobacterial infections, such as contact with soil, feces, wild animals and birds (8, 9). Organic farming reintroduces the parameters mentioned above to the management practice followed by many producers around Europe. Effectively concern is raised with regard to the probability of increased exposure-risk of organically reared fowl to mycobacterial infections. Although several groups have already studied the prevalence of different pathogens in organic farms of birds, there is no evidence to this day regarding mycobacteria (4, 5). For this reason we incorporated the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to the investigation of the prevalence of the major mycobacterial pathogens (M. tuberculosis complex, M. avium complex, M. genavense) in organically reared broilers in Greece.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Fragkiadaki2005EstimationOT, title={Estimation of the Prevalence of Pathogenic Mycobacteria in Organic Broiler Farms in Greece by the Polymerase Chain Reaction}, author={Eirini Fragkiadaki and Maria Gazouli and K. Sotirakoglou and Eftychia Xylouri}, year={2005} }