Estimation of hearing capabilities of Early Miocene sloths (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Folivora) and palaeobiological implications

@article{Blanco2016EstimationOH,
  title={Estimation of hearing capabilities of Early Miocene sloths (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Folivora) and palaeobiological implications},
  author={R. Ernesto Blanco and W. Jones},
  journal={Historical Biology},
  year={2016},
  volume={28},
  pages={390 - 397}
}
The Miocene Santacrucian sloths are a very important assemblage because they represent the first major radiation among sloths and, therefore, they could provide many insights about sloth evolution and diversity. Based on other studies, the hearing capabilities of Pleistocene sloths were identified. For a deeper understanding of these capabilities from an evolutionary point of view, in this article we study the hearing capabilities of Santacrucian sloths. We estimate the frequency range and the… Expand
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