Estimating the usefulness of distorted natural images using an image contour degradation measure.

@article{Rouse2011EstimatingTU,
  title={Estimating the usefulness of distorted natural images using an image contour degradation measure.},
  author={David M. Rouse and Sheila S. Hemami and Romuald P{\'e}pion and Patrick le Callet},
  journal={Journal of the Optical Society of America. A, Optics, image science, and vision},
  year={2011},
  volume={28 2},
  pages={
          157-88
        }
}
Quality estimators aspire to quantify the perceptual resemblance, but not the usefulness, of a distorted image when compared to a reference natural image. However, humans can successfully accomplish tasks (e.g., object identification) using visibly distorted images that are not necessarily of high quality. A suite of novel subjective experiments reveals that quality does not accurately predict utility (i.e., usefulness). Thus, even accurate quality estimators cannot accurately estimate utility… CONTINUE READING

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