Estimating the social costs of friendsourcing

@article{Rzeszotarski2014EstimatingTS,
  title={Estimating the social costs of friendsourcing},
  author={Jeffrey M. Rzeszotarski and Meredith Ringel Morris},
  journal={Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
  year={2014}
}
Every day users of social networking services ask their followers and friends millions of questions. These friendsourced questions not only provide informational benefits, but also may reinforce social bonds. However, there is a limit to how much a person may want to friendsource. They may be uncomfortable asking questions that are too private, might not want to expend others' time or effort, or may feel as though they have already accrued too many social debts. These perceived social costs… 

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