Estimating the potential for reinvasion by mammalian pests through pest-exclusion fencing

@article{Connolly2009EstimatingTP,
  title={Estimating the potential for reinvasion by mammalian pests through pest-exclusion fencing},
  author={Trevor Allan Connolly and Tim D. Day and Carolyn M. King},
  journal={Wildlife Research},
  year={2009},
  volume={36},
  pages={410-421}
}
Pest mammals are completely excluded from Maungatautari Ecological Island, New Zealand, by a 47-km Xcluder pest-proof fence; however, they are commonly sighted directly outside, along the fenceline. Permanent pest exclusion relies on maintaining fence integrity, and enhancing knowledge of pest activity and behaviour at fenced reserves. We describe summer and winter periods of activity and behaviour of mammalian pests directly adjacent to the pest-proof fence. We (1) tested for the effects of… 

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