Estimating the health and economic burden of cancer among those diagnosed as adolescents and young adults.

@article{Guy2014EstimatingTH,
  title={Estimating the health and economic burden of cancer among those diagnosed as adolescents and young adults.},
  author={Gery P. Guy and K. Robin Yabroff and Donatus U. Ekwueme and Ashley Wilder Smith and Emily C. Dowling and Ruth Rechis and Stephanie A Nutt and Lisa C. Richardson},
  journal={Health affairs},
  year={2014},
  volume={33 6},
  pages={
          1024-31
        }
}
Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors-those who were ages 15-39 at their first cancer diagnosis-have important health limitations. These survivors are at risk for higher health care expenditures and lost productivity, compared to adults without a history of cancer. Using Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data, we present nationally representative estimates of the economic burden among people who were diagnosed with cancer in adolescence or young adulthood. Our findings demonstrate that… 
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