Estimating the Rate of Phenotypic Evolution from Comparative Data

@article{Martins1994EstimatingTR,
  title={Estimating the Rate of Phenotypic Evolution from Comparative Data},
  author={Em{\'i}lia P. Martins},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1994},
  volume={144},
  pages={193 - 209}
}
  • E. Martins
  • Published 1 August 1994
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
This study presents a method to estimate rates of evolutionary change in continuous characters from comparative data. The technique is similar to those introduced previously in which between-species divergence is estimated as a function of time since divergence but also takes into account the possible statistical nonindependence of trait values measured from phylogenetically related species in an approach similar to the independent contrasts methods used in interspecific data analysis. The use… 
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