Estimating the Fundamental Matrix Using Second-Order Cone Programming

@inproceedings{Yang2011EstimatingTF,
  title={Estimating the Fundamental Matrix Using Second-Order Cone Programming},
  author={Min Yang},
  booktitle={AICI},
  year={2011}
}
  • Min Yang
  • Published in AICI 24 September 2011
  • Computer Science
Computing the fundamental matrix is the first step of many computer vision applications including camera calibration, image rectification and structure from motion. A new method for the estimation of the fundamental matrix from point correspondences is presented. The minimization of the geometric error is performed based L- infinity norm minimization framework. A single global minimum exists and it may be found by SOCP (Second-Order Cone Programming), which is a standard technique in convex… 

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