Estimating biomass consumed from fire using MODIS FRE

@article{Ellicott2009EstimatingBC,
  title={Estimating biomass consumed from fire using MODIS FRE},
  author={Evan Ellicott and Eric F. Vermote and Louis Giglio and Gareth Roberts},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2009},
  volume={36}
}
Biomass burning is an important global phenomenon impacting atmospheric composition. Application of satellite based measures of fire radiative energy (FRE) has been shown to be effective for estimating biomass consumed, which can then be used to estimate gas and aerosol emissions. However, application of FRE has been limited in both temporal and spatial scale. In this paper we offer a methodology to estimate FRE globally for 2001–2007 at monthly time steps using MODIS. Accuracy assessment shows… 

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