Estimating Self-Sustainability in Peer-to-Peer Swarming Systems

@article{Menasch2010EstimatingSI,
  title={Estimating Self-Sustainability in Peer-to-Peer Swarming Systems},
  author={Daniel Sadoc Menasch{\'e} and Antonio A. Rocha and Edmundo de Souza e Silva and Rosa Maria Meri Le{\~a}o and Donald F. Towsley and Arun Venkataramani},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2010},
  volume={abs/1004.0395}
}
Implications of peer selection strategies by publishers on the performance of P2P swarming systems
TLDR
An upper bound on the throughput is derived when the stable publisher adopts the most deprived peer selection [1] and rarest-first piece selection, while peers adopt random peer selection and random useful piece selection.
On the Interplay between Content Popularity and Performance in P2P Systems
TLDR
This paper surveys recent work on peer-to-peer swarming, relating content popularity to three performance metrics of such systems: fairness, content availability/ self-sustainability and scalability.
Give-and-take based peer-to-peer content distribution networks
TLDR
This paper proposes an optimal algorithm, and provides a sub-optimal algorithm that is nearly optimal, but runs much more quickly; this provides an attractive balance between running time and performance.
Stability of a Peer-to-Peer Communication System
  • Ji Zhu, B. Hajek
  • Computer Science
    IEEE Transactions on Information Theory
  • 2012
TLDR
It is shown that stability can be achieved with only a small amount of help from peer seeds-even with very little help from a fixed seed, peers need dwell as peer seeds on average only long enough to upload one additional piece.
Coalitions Improve Performance in Data Swarming Systems
TLDR
This paper proposes a simple Random Choking strategy for peers inside a coalition and develops an analytical model for studying its performance, which accurately predicts a coalition's performance and shows that the proposed strategy helps a coalition achieve near-optimal performance.
A case for coalitions in data swarming systems
TLDR
A random choking strategy is proposed, and it is shown that it can help a coalition achieve near-optimal performance and it significantly outperforms not only Tit-for-Tat strategy but also unchoke-all strategy.
Tradeoffs in cloud and peer-assisted content delivery systems
TLDR
This work considers a peer-assisted content delivery system that aims to provide guaranteed average download rate to its customers, and shows that bandwidth demand peaks for contents with moderate popularity, and that careful system design is needed if locality is an important criterion when choosing cloud-based service provisioning.
Modeling Flash Crowd Performance in Peer-to-Peer File Distribution
TLDR
Based on the evolution of the utilization of available peer bandwidth over time, an analytical model for flash crowds in homogeneous and heterogeneous bandwidth swarms is formulated and can be used to predict the scalability of the system when the number of peers increases, and to provision forflash crowds by estimating the server bandwidth to achieve a minimum quality of service.
Efficient and highly available peer discovery: A case for independent trackers and gossiping
TLDR
This work proposes two protocols that connect peers in different swarms efficiently with a constant, but tunable, overhead overhead, and develops analytical models of the protocols based on renewal theory, and validate the models using both extensive simulations and controlled experiments.
Design and Analysis of Coalitions in Data Swarming Systems
TLDR
A simple random choking strategy can help a coalition achieve near-optimal performance by optimally choosing the re-choking interval lengths and the number unchoke slots and an analytical model is developed that can be easily adapted to model a BitTorrent-like swarm.
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References

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The system is based on a wire protocol that enables the Antfarm coordinator to gather information on swarm dynamics, detect misbehaving hosts, and direct the peers' allotment of upload bandwidth among multiple swarms.
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It is shown that, under a properly designed random walk propagation mechanism, hybrid peer-to-peer systems can support an unbounded number of users while requiring only bounded resources both at the server and at individual peers.
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An analytic performance analysis that is based on a new uplink-sharing version of the well-known broadcasting problem is provided, providing a lower bound which can be used as a performance benchmark for any P2P file dissemination system.
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This work considers a transient regime which is key to capturing the ability of P2P file sharing systems to handle bursty traffic, e.g., flash crowds and finds that the average delays scale well in the offered load.
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It is demonstrated that all peers contribute resources that do not directly improve their performance, and it is shown that when applied universally, strategic clients can hurt average per-swarm performance compared to today's BitTorrent client implementations.
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TLDR
The initial evolution can be coupled with Polya urn model with well known distribution, then the corresponding differential equations can be numerically solved and results compared with simulations of the true discrete model.
Rarest first and choke algorithms are enough
TLDR
It is shown that the rarest first algorithm in its latest version fosters reciprocation and is robust to free riders, and the choke algorithm is fair and its replacement with a bit level tit-for-tat solution is not appropriate.
The missing piece syndrome in peer-to-peer communication
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  • Computer Science
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TLDR
This paper identifies a problem that can occur if the seeding rate is not large enough and, even if the statistics of the system are symmetric in the pieces, there can be symmetry breaking, with one piece becoming very rare.
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