Estimating Scandinavian and Gaelic ancestry in the male settlers of Iceland.

@article{Helgason2000EstimatingSA,
  title={Estimating Scandinavian and Gaelic ancestry in the male settlers of Iceland.},
  author={Agnar Helgason and S Sigureth ard{\'o}ttir and Jay Nicholson and Bryan C. Sykes and Emmeline W. Hill and Daniel G. Bradley and Vidar Bosnes and Jeffery R Gulcher and Ryk H Ward and K{\'a}ri Stef{\'a}nsson},
  journal={American journal of human genetics},
  year={2000},
  volume={67 3},
  pages={
          697-717
        }
}
We present findings based on a study of Y-chromosome diallelic and microsatellite variation in 181 Icelanders, 233 Scandinavians, and 283 Gaels from Ireland and Scotland. All but one of the Icelandic Y chromosomes belong to haplogroup 1 (41.4%), haplogroup 2 (34.2%), or haplogroup 3 (23.8%). We present phylogenetic networks of Icelandic Y-chromosome variation, using haplotypes constructed from seven diallelic markers and eight microsatellite markers, and we propose two new clades. We also… 
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