Estimating Age-Dependent Extinction: Contrasting Evidence from Fossils and Phylogenies

@article{Hagen2018EstimatingAE,
  title={Estimating Age-Dependent Extinction: Contrasting Evidence from Fossils and Phylogenies},
  author={Oskar Hagen and Tobias Andermann and Tiago Bosisio Quental and Alexandre Antonelli and Daniele Silvestro},
  journal={Systematic Biology},
  year={2018},
  volume={67},
  pages={458 - 474}
}
&NA; The estimation of diversification rates is one of the most vividly debated topics in modern systematics, with considerable controversy surrounding the power of phylogenetic and fossil‐based approaches in estimating extinction. Van Valen's seminal work from 1973 proposed the “Law of constant extinction,” which states that the probability of extinction of taxa is not dependent on their age. This assumption of age‐independent extinction has prevailed for decades with its assessment based on… 

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