Estimates of the cancer burden in Europe from radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident

@article{Cardis2006EstimatesOT,
  title={Estimates of the cancer burden in Europe from radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident},
  author={Elisabeth Cardis and Daniel Krewski and Mathieu Boniol and Vladimir Drozdovitch and Sarah C. Darby and Ethel S. Gilbert and Suminori Akiba and Jacques B{\'e}nichou and Jacques Ferlay and Sara Gandini and Catherine Hill and Geoffrey R. Howe and Ausrele Kesminiene and Mirjana Moser and Marie Sanchez and Hans Henrik Storm and Laurent Voisin and Peter Boyle},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2006},
  volume={119}
}
The Chernobyl accident, which occurred April 26, 1986, resulted in a large release of radionuclides, which were deposited over a very wide area, particularly in Europe. Although an increased risk of thyroid cancer in exposed children has been clearly demonstrated in the most contaminated regions, the impact of the accident on the risk of other cancers as well as elsewhere in Europe is less clear. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the human cancer burden in Europe as a whole… 
Chernobyl fallout and cancer incidence in Finland 1988–2007
TLDR
The analysis of a large cohort over two decades did not reveal an increase in cancer incidence following the Chernobyl accident, with the possible exception of colon cancer among women.
Radiation exposure to the population of Europe following the Chernobyl accident.
TLDR
The impact of the Chernobyl accident on the global burden of human cancer in Europe required the estimation of radiation doses in each of the 40 European countries, and thyroid doses to adults were consistently lower than the doses received by young children.
Non-thyroid cancer in Northern Ukraine in the post-Chernobyl period: Short report.
ON CANCER WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION BRIEFING DOCUMENT The Cancer Burden from Chernobyl in Europe
• Thus it is not possible to infer the possible cancer burden from the accident on the bases of studies of its health effects to date. The estimation of the cancer burden from Chernobyl must rely on
1 ASSESSMENT OF CHERNOBYL MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
TLDR
The present report estimates the expected increase in the incidence and mortality from malignant neoplasms in European countries resulting from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986-2056 and predicts that Belarus will account for about 20% of all additional solid cancer and leukaemia cases.
Twenty years' experience with post-Chernobyl thyroid cancer.
  • Dillwyn Williams
  • Medicine
    Best practice & research. Clinical endocrinology & metabolism
  • 2008
CURRENT STATUS AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RESEARCH NEEDS FOR ACHIEVING A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT
Twenty years after the Chernobyl accident, there is no clearly demonstrated increase in the incidence of cancers in the most affected populations that can be attributed to radiation from the
Is Chernobyl radiation the main cause of cancer deaths? - The research on cancer mortality before and after 1986
The Chernobyl catastrophe is still referred to as the biggest radioactivity fallout problem in the history of the world. The cloud that was released from the broken reactor travelled across larger
The Chernobyl Accident 20 Years On: An Assessment of the Health Consequences and the International Response
TLDR
Because of the problems with the international response to Chernobyl, the United Nations should initiate an independent review of the actions and assignments of the agencies concerned, with recommendations for dealing with future international-scale accidents.
LEUKEMIA FOLLOWING THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT
TLDR
It is concluded that, possibly apart from Russian cleanup workers, no meaningful evidence of any statistical association between exposure and leukemia risk as yet exists and it is important to carry on with such studies to satisfy various public health objectives.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 57 REFERENCES
Estimated long term health effects of the Chernobyl accident
TLDR
The exposures for populations due to the Chernobyl accident are different in type and pattern from those of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Japan, so predictions derived from studies of these populations are uncertain.
Risk of thyroid cancer after exposure to 131I in childhood.
TLDR
Stable iodine supplementation in iodine-deficient populations may substantially reduce the risk of thyroid cancer related to radioactive iodines in case of exposure to radioactive iodine in childhood that may occur after radiation accidents or during medical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.
Breast cancer in Belarus and Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident
TLDR
Increases in breast cancer incidence in all areas following the Chernobyl accident were demonstrated, reflecting improvements in cancer diagnosis and registration, and a significant 2‐fold increase in risk was observed in the most contaminated districts during the period 1997–2001.
Cancer consequences of the Chernobyl accident: 20 years on.
  • E. Cardis, G. Howe, I. Zvonova
  • Medicine
    Journal of radiological protection : official journal of the Society for Radiological Protection
  • 2006
TLDR
A dramatic increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer has been observed among those exposed to radioactive iodines in childhood and adolescence in the most contaminated territories, and there are at present no clearly demonstrated radiation-related increases in cancer risk.
RADIOLOGICAL IMPACT IN GREECE OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT—A 10‐y RETROSPECTIVE SYNOPSIS
TLDR
The present study summarizes the published results of the studies of the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory on the radiological impact in Greece of the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the variations in the air concentrations of certain radionuclides and those of the gamma-ray intensity.
RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF 131I DEPOSITION DENSITY AND THYROID DOSE IN POLAND AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT
Abstract— The 131I deposition in Poland after the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986 was evaluated from the determined 129I deposition and the estimated 129I/131I ratio at the time of the arrival of
Thyroid dosimetry in the western trace of the Chernobyl accident plume.
TLDR
These investigations demonstrate that in thyroid dosimetry it is important to know the stable iodine status as well as to have a standardised method for airborne radioiodine measurements, especially for consideration of stable iodine prophylaxis based on the inhalation exposure pathway.
Childhood leukaemia in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine following the Chernobyl power station accident: results from an international collaborative population-based case-control study.
TLDR
It is concluded this study provides no convincing evidence of an increased risk of childhood leukaemia as a result of exposure to Chernobyl radiation, since it is unclear whether the results are due to a true radiation-related excess, a sampling-derived bias in Ukraine, or some combination thereof.
Childhood leukaemia in Europe after Chernobyl: 5 year follow-up.
TLDR
There was a slight increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia in Europe during this period, but the overall geographical pattern of change bears no relation to estimated exposure to radiation resulting from the Chernobyl accident.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...