Estimates of the Social Cost of Carbon: Concepts and Results from the DICE-2013R Model and Alternative Approaches

@article{Nordhaus2014EstimatesOT,
  title={Estimates of the Social Cost of Carbon: Concepts and Results from the DICE-2013R Model and Alternative Approaches},
  author={William Nordhaus},
  journal={Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists},
  year={2014},
  volume={1},
  pages={273 - 312}
}
  • W. Nordhaus
  • Published 1 March 2014
  • Economics
  • Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists
The social cost of carbon (SCC) is an important concept for understanding and implementing climate change policies. This term represents the economic cost caused by an additional ton of carbon dioxide emissions (or more succinctly carbon) or its equivalent. The present study describes the development of the concept, provides examples of its use in current US regulator policies, examines its analytical background, and estimates the SCC using an updated integrated assessment model, the DICE-2013R… 
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