Estimates of loudness, loudness discomfort, and the auditory dynamic range: normative estimates, comparison of procedures, and test-retest reliability.

@article{Sherlock2005EstimatesOL,
  title={Estimates of loudness, loudness discomfort, and the auditory dynamic range: normative estimates, comparison of procedures, and test-retest reliability.},
  author={L P Sherlock and Craig Formby},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Audiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={16 2},
  pages={
          85-100
        }
}
  • L. Sherlock, C. Formby
  • Published 1 February 2005
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of the American Academy of Audiology
The purpose of this series of experiments was to establish normative reference values for absolute and relative judgements of loudness discomfort and for the auditory dynamic range (DR), and to evaluate intersubject variability and intra-subject test-retest reliability for the respective measures of loudness discomfort. To establish the normal auditory DR, audiometric thresholds and loudness discomfort levels (LDLs) were measured from a group of 59 normal-hearing adults without sound tolerance… 
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TLDR
The Contour Test appears to offer a viable approach to clinical measurement of loudness perception: It has good patient acceptance and combines fairly rapid administration with acceptable reliability, and can be used to construct a template for clinical comparison of normative values to patient loudness growth curves.
Test‐Retest Reliability of Loudness Scaling
TLDR
Loudness scaling is a longer test than most conventional suprathreshold measures and requires special equipment, but has good test‐retest reliability and provides more information on the loudness function that might be useful in the fitting of nonlinear hearing aids.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
There were considerable differences between listeners in both groups regarding the individual shape and absolute position of the loudness functions, and no normative reference could be extracted that would allow for a quantification of the bandwidth effect on an individual basis.
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TLDR
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