Establishment of Joint Attention in Dyads Involving Hearing Mothers of Deaf and Hearing Children, and Its Relation to Adaptive Social Behavior

@article{Nowakowski2009EstablishmentOJ,
  title={Establishment of Joint Attention in Dyads Involving Hearing Mothers of Deaf and Hearing Children, and Its Relation to Adaptive Social Behavior},
  author={Matilda E. Nowakowski and Matilda E. Susan L. Louis A. Tasker and Matilda E. Susan L. Louis A. Schmidt},
  journal={American Annals of the Deaf},
  year={2009},
  volume={154},
  pages={15 - 29}
}
Mounting evidence points to joint attention as a mediating variable in children's adaptive behavior development. Joint attention in interactions between hearing mothers and congenitally deaf (n = 27) and hearing (n = 29) children, ages 18–36 months, was examined. All deaf children had severe to profound hearing loss. Mother-child interactions were coded for maternally initiated and child-initiated success rates in establishing joint attention; mothers completed ratings of their children's… Expand
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