Essentiality of fatty acids

@article{Spector2007EssentialityOF,
  title={Essentiality of fatty acids},
  author={Arthur A. Spector},
  journal={Lipids},
  year={2007},
  volume={34},
  pages={S1-S3}
}
All fatty acids have important functions, but the term “essential” is applied only to those polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) that are necessary for good health and cannot be completely synthesized in the body. The need for arachidonic acid, which is utilized for eicosanoid synthesis and is a constituent of membrane phospholipids involved in signal transduction, is the main reason why the n-6 class of PUFA are essential. Physiological data indicate that n-3 PUFA also are essential. Although… Expand
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