Escape of malaria parasites from host immunity requires CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

@article{Hisaeda2004EscapeOM,
  title={Escape of malaria parasites from host immunity requires CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells},
  author={Hajime Hisaeda and Yoichi Maekawa and Daiji Iwakawa and Hiroko Okada and Kunisuke Himeno and Kenji Kishihara and Shin-ichi Tsukumo and Koji Yasutomo},
  journal={Nature Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={10},
  pages={29-30}
}
Infection with malaria parasites frequently induces total immune suppression, which makes it difficult for the host to maintain long-lasting immunity. Here we show that depletion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) protects mice from death when infected with a lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii, and that this protection is associated with an increased T-cell responsiveness against parasite-derived antigens. These results suggest that activation of Treg cells contributes to immune suppression… Expand
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